You are currently browsing the Breaching The Web blog archives for August, 2002.

A peak in the window

August 30th, 2002

Inspired by a really horrible video on VH1 last night, I asked my husband “Do you think the Captain and Tennille were ever guest stars on The Love Boat?” His response was something like “They must have been, but I don’t know for sure.”

Enter the world wide web. According to Love Boat Online, Toni Tennille appeared as a guest star in one episode, without her Captain, in 1978. She was in Episode 31: The Kissing Bandit/Mike and Ike/The Witness.

And for the curious, here’s some information on what the Captain and Tennille are doing now.

Ha!

August 29th, 2002

Another piece of brillance from Politics in the Zeros: A “Justification” for War with Iraq

Tag

August 28th, 2002

This is the best application of Trackback I’ve seen yet — Con dot Jose. By collecting posts on one topic from a variety of weblogs, the trackback feature is actually adding value to the site. Other uses I’ve seen thus far have been little more than elaborated commenting systems.

Although it is entirely possible that I have been out of the loop. Hard to believe, but it has happened before. What other cool Trackback implementations are out there?

Remember Anthrax?

August 27th, 2002

The FBI will re-enter the AMI Building, which was vacated in October of last year, to search for anthrax samples which they will compare to samples taken from the scene of other anthrax attacks.

Since leaving the building, AMI has published its weekly magazines (among them, The National Enquirer) from other offices in Florida. The company cannot afford to clean up the building. Sen. Bill Nelson (D-Florida) will introduce legislation in the Senate next week that would allow the Federal government to take over the building. Company officials have stated that they would give the building to the government for use as an anthrax laboratory.

Reading Islam

August 20th, 2002

UNC students are reading a book about the Qur’an after all, in spite of a legal challenge from a conservative Christian group.

And then there were two

August 16th, 2002

I’m fascinated by environmental disasters created by human agency. Plagues of mice, bleached coral, stagnant seas, etc. all fascinate me on a fairly deep level. On the one hand, I see them as physical expressions of humanity’s disrespect for the planet we live on, and I am deeply outraged.

But on the other hand, there are moments when I find such disasters…um…well… cool. The disaster that took place in 1980 on Lake Peigneur [link via Looka!] falls into this later category (there was only one previous occupant of this category, and that is the creation of the Salton Sea).

The water of Lake Peigneur slowly started to turn, eventually forming a giant whirlpool. A large crater developed in the bottom of the lake. It was like someone pulled the stopper out of the bottom of a giant bathtub.

The crater grew larger and larger (it would eventually reach sixty yards in diameter). The water went down the hole faster and faster. The lake had been connected by the Delcambre Canal to the Gulf of Mexico, some twelve miles away. The ever-emptying lake caused the canal to lower by 3.5 feet and to start flowing in reverse. A fifty foot waterfall (the highest ever to exist in the state) formed where the canal water emptied into the crater.

Albatross

August 15th, 2002

If the world were merely seductive, that would be easy.
If it were merely challenging, that would be no problem.

But I arise in the morning torn between a desire to change the world and a desire to enjoy the world.

This makes it hard to plan the day.

~E.B. White

Grrl Power

August 14th, 2002

Myrtle Shoupe has been writing a column for the Manchester Enterprise newspaper for 48 years. The paper serves the community of Clay County, Kentucky, which claims to be both America’s “most interesting county” and “most fascinating community”.

Ms. Shoupe’s column, Hima News, features local news items and commentary, written with flair and style (and creative spelling and grammar). She has selected a few of her favorite columns to feature on the web site.

Ms. Shoupe has the soul of a weblogger.

Also worth reading: Sample Headlines from the Enterprise (my favorite is “Fireman Explodes During Council Meeting”).

Um, yeah.

August 14th, 2002

Perhaps I have read too much, but this strikes me as a really bad idea: Modified Virus May Help Kill Rodent Pests.

The virus leaves the pest sterilized. If this were a science fiction novel, the virus would mutate and sterilize other species as well. If this were a Greg Bear novel, the virus would sterilize humans.

I suppose I should be glad this isn’t a Greg Bear novel.

[link via Unknown News]

What’s the difference?

August 13th, 2002

A river is a natural stream of running water emptying into an ocean, lake or other large body of water.

A branch is a tributary to a river.

A stream is a body of running water, especially such a body moving over the earth’s surface in a channel or bed.

A run is a small, fast-moving stream.

A brook is a small, natural freshwater stream.

A creek is a small shallow stream, usually intermitant or seasonal, that is a tributary to a river.

I was curious as to how all these things were different. Now I know. And knowing is half the battle.